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Electronic Textbook

President Obama

President Bush

Presidency Book

Selected Contents in Korean

My Articles on U.S. Foreign Policy

My Articles on U.S. Politics

My Articles on the Asia Pacific

Science Fiction Website

Biography

Dennis Florig 

Professor

Division of International Studies

Hankuk (Korean) University of Foreign Studies

Seoul, South Korea

   
   ( click here for a more complete professional curriculum vitae)

  Career Highlights

  two decades teaching American Studies, English, and Political Science in Asia

      15+ years as a university professor in Korea
      3+ years teaching adult Japanese preparing for graduate study in the US

  6 years teaching Political Science at American universities

  Book: The Power of Presidential Ideologies

  Academic Journal Publications on

      Democracy and empire in U.S. foreign policy
     Bush administration policy toward North Korea  
      How to teach American Studies to Korean students
     the future of the Asia-Pacific region
     The terrorism war
     U.S. Parties and Elections
     U.S. Foreign Policy 
     American social welfare ideology
     techniques of teaching English to Japanese salarymen

  Teaching and Research Websites

     Electronic Textbook on American Studies and International Studies
     Professor Florig’s Website
     Revised Internet Edition of presidency book
 
  Personal Interests (not listed in order of importance)

     Surfing the net
     Loud rock and roll
     good science fiction
     basketball
     one very special woman
     intercultural communication
     thoughtful argument about politics, religion, and philosophy
     world peace

  Reflections on a Decade and a half of Living in Korea and Japan

I have spent the last 65 years teaching in East Asia . They say a good teacher never stops learning, and living in Korea and Japan has certainly been a great learning experience for me.

I have learned a lot about the Korean and Japanese people, but I have learned more about myself.

I have learned much about the scope and depth of "globalization," but I have also seen the vast differences in thinking between East and West.

I have learned much about Korean and Japanese culture, but I have also recognized how much I remain an American.

I am just beginning to grasp the magnificent diversity of peoples and cultures around the world, but I also see ever more clearly the dangers of American political hegemony and the mindless spread of western global monoculture.